Revelation 3:16-18 (Daily Verse and Comment)


(16) So then because thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will spue thee out of my mouth.

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Revelation 3:16-18

(16) So then because thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will spue thee out of my mouth. (17) Because thou sayest, I am rich, and increased with goods, and have need of nothing; and knowest not that thou art wretched, and miserable, and poor, and blind, and naked: (18) I counsel thee to buy of me gold tried in the fire, that thou mayest be rich; and white raiment, that thou mayest be clothed, and that the shame of thy nakedness do not appear; and anoint thine eyes with eyesalve, that thou mayest see.

Leviticus 4:2

(2) Speak unto the children of Israel, saying, If a soul shall sin through ignorance against any of the commandments of the LORD concerning things which ought not to be done, and shall do against any of them:
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The drifting of the Laodicean happens so subtly that he is unaware of the decline of his spiritual perception and vigor. What happens when a person begins drifting is that human nature deceives him to judge two things wrongly: 1) the quality of his own spirituality and therefore, 2) the use of his time.

Consider the process of the Laodicean’s decline: Does he stop to consider himself as loving death? On the contrary, his nature is selling him on what it calls “enjoying life.” However, the reality is that because he enjoys it so much, he thinks that he is fine the way he is. He, though, is guilty of a very serious sin: presumption. This is a sin in which ignorance frequently plays only a small part. When someone is presumptuous, knowledge of what is right is usually available, but he does not think his intent and conduct through to a right conclusion.

On the other hand, carelessness plays a large role in presumption. The Laodiceans should have known better than what their actions reveal. Their lackadaisical approach to spiritual matters, to their Savior who died for them, has earned His stinging rebuke.

Leviticus 4:2 zeroes in on this sin, revealing that it may be more serious than one might suppose. The word “unintentionally” includes more than simply lack of intention, as when a person sins and says, “I really didn’t mean it.” That is not wrong, but it misses some of the point because that conclusion is shallow and broad. In spite of the sinner’s feelings about his intent as he actually committed the act, the term “sin” still appears in God’s charge, and he continues to turn aside, wander, err, make a mistake, miss the mark, and go off the path. Though unintentional, the act is still a sin.

Consider the possible effects of such a sin. How many deaths have occurred where a person did something seriously wrong yet claims, “I didn’t mean for that to happen”? What could happen if someone is cruising along, not concentrating on his driving, and drifts into oncoming traffic, smashing into another car and killing its occupants? How many people have been killed because a driver’s attention was diverted by a cell phone? Just because a sin is unintentional does not mean it is not serious. Such a sin is often one of careless, impatient, lackadaisical neglect. It is the ignoring of a higher priority.

It is in reality often a sin of presumption, an ignoring of God and His law. It includes sins done with a degree of consciousness, a level of awareness of what one’s responsibilities are. Even though not arrogantly and deliberately done, they are in reality done willingly.

These can be quite serious. Exodus 20:7, the third commandment, reads, “You shall not take the name of the LORD your God in vain, for the LORD will not hold him guiltless who takes His name in vain.” Because we have been baptized and have received God’s Spirit, we have taken on the name “Christian.” We are children of God, followers of Christ, and as such, we bear the Family name, an honor not lightly bestowed. Recall again that to whom much is given, the more shall be required.

God warns that we must not bear that holy name carelessly, that is, to no good purpose. He will not hold us guiltless. That name must be borne responsibly in dignified honor to Him, to His Family, and to its operations and purposes. Can we afford to be presumptuously negligent in this privileged responsibility? It is right here that knowledge of God’s justice should come to a Christian’s mind. It does this because the Christian “sees” God—not literally, of course, but spiritually, in his mind’s eye, because he knows Him.

— John W. Ritenbaugh

To learn more, see:
Living by Faith and God’s Justice

Related Topics:
Acting Presumptuously
Carelessness
Deleterious Effects of Neglect
Drifting
Drifting Spiritually
Enjoying Life
Impatience
Lackadaisical Approach to Morality
Lackadaisical Attitudes
Laodicea, Church of
Laodicean Attitude
Neglect
Presumption
Presumptuous Neglect
Spiritual Drifting

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